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History of Shaolin-Do
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The Fukien Shaolin monks took it upon themselves to protect the Fukienese coast from the raids of Japanese pirates.  They were tremendously effective, earning the love and respect of the common people.  When word reached the Ch'ing Kwang Hsu Emperor in Peking, at the beginning of the 20th century, trouble brewed.  Kwang Hsu saw the Fukien monks as potential rebels with widespread popular support.  He secretly dispatched imperial troops, armed with cannons on a mission to destroy the Fukien Temple.  He even sent a renegade Shaolin Master, Chi Tao Su, the White Eyebrow Monk, to strengthen the attacking force.

A sympathetic official warned the monks of the impending attack. The Fukien Masters chose a surprising, ingenious solution. They evacuated the Temple, removed all of its valuable artwork and books, and set fire to the temple themselves. They hoped to rebuild the Temple in more favorable times. More favorable times never came.

Grandmaster Su and his disciples retreated into the Fukienese mountains to continue their training. One of the disciples was Ie Chang Ming, the man who would become the second of the three Grandmasters of our lineage. Su Kong died in 1928 at the age of 79.

Ie Chang Ming was born in 1880. He was admitted to the Fukien Temple as a small boy. Like Su Kong, Ie Chang Ming poured all of his time and energy into the martial arts training, especially the Golden Snake style. Tied hand and foot, he could evade spear thrusts by twisting and turning like a snake. He could also wrap his body around a pole climb it, like a snake on a vine.

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